What does Islam say about homosexuality?

The Qur’an doesn’t mention homosexuality at all, and when it does mention “men who are not in need of women” it doesn’t condemn them. All of this might be surprising when you consider the impression most of the media has given about Omar Mateen’s killing of nearly 50 people at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida.

The Independent reports how the recent rise of political Islam and jihadism by extremist groups, had lead to more homophobic talk by not only Muslim extremists but also the general Muslim population. A study in the UK over the last 12 months showed that 50% of Muslims thought homosexuality should be made illegal. I wonder what the Christian population of Britain would say? Would they have a similar opinion?

Whereas homosexuality is not explicitly condemned in Islam sacred writing, in the Bible it is clear: homosexuality is a sin.

  • Leviticus 18:22, “You shall not lie with a male as one lies with a female; it is an abomination.”
  • Leviticus 20:13, “If there is a man who lies with a male as those who lie with a woman, both of them have committed a detestable act; they shall surely be put to death. Their bloodguiltness is upon them.”
  • 1 Corinthians 6:9-10, “Or do you not know that the unrighteous shall not inherit the kingdom of God? Do not be deceived; neither fornicators, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor effeminate, nor homosexuals, 10 nor thieves, nor the covetous, nor drunkards, nor revilers, nor swindlers, shall inherit the kingdom of God.”

However we know from studying Christianity that different denominations of Christianity follow these Bible teaching to different extents. That some Christians would rather follow the Golden Rule or try to follow Jesus’ teachings of always doing the most loving thing and remembering to forgive.

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Should Tyson Fury be allowed to win the BBC Sports Personality of the Year award?

He became the Heavyweight Champion of the World just over a week ago but have Tyson Fury’s comments about women and homosexuality ruined his chances of being a contender for the coveted BBC Sports Personality of the Year Award?

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Petitions have been gathering thousands of signatures from people who say his comments are so sexist, homophobic and therefore dangerous he’s not worthy of winning a national sports prize. The BBC have even had to say that Tyson Fury’s beliefs are not supported by the media organisation.

About women he said that Ennis-Hill, a fellow contender for the award, “slaps up good”. He also said: “A woman’s best place is in the kitchen and on her back – that’s my personal belief.”

When put on the defensive in an interview with Channel 5 on Saturday night, the 27-year-old said: “If I am going to get in trouble for giving women compliments for wearing a dress, then what has the world come to? Listen, I’m the heavyweight champion of the world and people look up to me. If there’s any women in here tonight wearing dresses, I think everybody looks beautiful in a dress.”

Before his big fight with Kitschko where he won the Heavyweight belt he made comments comparing homosexuality and abortion to paedophilia and then afterwards attempted to play down his comments by saying they come straight from “the holy scriptures”.

What do you think?

About his Christian faith he said after the career defining fight with Kitschko that “God gave me the victory” and he also wore a t-shirt with the slogan: “God is all things most high”.

In an interview with the Catholic Herald in Ireland he said that God gives talents and he is using his to the best of his ability, and boxing is just a sport. While his mother is a Protestant and his father is a Catholic, neither is practicing. His uncle, a born-again Christian and preacher, introduced him to religion. While he speaks in a very evangelical way he was particularly drawn to Catholicism.

He said that he goes to church every Sunday and reads the Bible, both of which give him strength to know that “if God is in my corner then no one can beat me.”

Back in a 2011 interview he said that he would not be ashamed of God but rather by putting Him first “everything will work out.”

“Everything is destined to be in life, every turn we take is planned.”

“From the first moment I laced on a pair of boxing gloves, there wasn’t one person in my family who didn’t believe I wasn’t going to be the heavyweight champion of the world,” he said. He added that he had become the first Traveller ever in history to win the world heavyweight championship and concluded that God gave him the victory.

Jesse J criticised for saying being bisexual was ‘a phase’

Jessie J has responded to criticism on Tuesday, following comments that her bisexuality “was a phase”. “Please tell me what I have done wrong here?” she complained on Twitter. “Should I have lied and said I am bi?”

Jesse J

Read the article which includes her twitter response from the Guardian about how she didn’t want to lie that at the moment she is only interested in men.

Not wanting to go off topic, but do we get male singers who dance around in tight underwear to sell their music?

A common GCSE question is whether the attitudes to homosexuality have changed in the UK over recent years. Students rightly refer to legal changes, the most recent being the Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Act 2013 and also the Equality Act 2010 which protects people from discrimination in the workplace and wider society. They can also refer to how the media (film, TV and newspapers) has become more accepting coverage of homosexual lifestyles.

With regards the latter, one of today’s most popular TV programmes has a gay character with Games of Thrones’ actor Finn Jones explaining his pride in the role in this Daily Mail article:

‘Having a gay character in Game Of Thrones was never a gimmick,’ he said.

Knight of flowers

Loras was written with such truth and conviction, it wasn’t something that was crass. I never had a problem playing a gay character because it was authentic.’ 

‘Recently gay characters have been used as the comedy in a show or they have weak elements to them. The great thing about Loras is that he has a feminine side to him, but he’s actually a very strong-minded character and he’s a fighter. He’s a warrior. It’s nice to see that on television because it’s true to modern gay people, who aren’t just one thing or the other.’